My earliest recollections of the desire to design and create dates back to my childhood in the late 70s and early 80s. I was seven years old when Star Wars came out. I fell in love with not only the movie but also the beautiful illustrative work that helped promote the franchise. I received a few books the following Christmas that included illustrations by Hildebrandt brothers and cross section diagrams of starships. Pouring over their pages and seeing what was possible made me want very badly to become an artist. When I wasn’t out riding my skateboard or BMX bike, I could be found drawing X-wing and Tie fighters long past bedtime. A few years later my parents purchased an Apple //e for the house. Oh what a glorious time this was! I spent hours playing Zork and Wizardry making maps on graph paper that helped me complete the torturous mazes. When I wasn’t playing games, I spent much of my time on the computer experimenting with rudimentary graphics programs. I didn’t know it at the time, but this glorious machine with green monochrome screen and 64k memory would steer me in the direction I'm headed today. My creative endeavors went on hiatus for a time and it wasn’t until my mid 20s that the spark for creation was rekindled. I had just been honorably discharged from the Marine Corps and I faced with the proposition of what to do with my life. I moved to Colorado and found work at a technical support call center. It was here that I rediscovered computers and was introduced to Photoshop and Bryce 3D. Shortly after being introduced to these programs, I enrolled in the Art Institute of Colorado and began studying 3D Design & Animation. After graduation from art school, I went to work as a graphic/motion designer for a small local instructional design company. Here, I learned the ways of the digital artist and immersed myself in all the latest tools and programs. I also learned that I didn’t need to sit in a cubicle all day to work on the stuff I love. Thankfully, with increasing internet speeds and changing business models, I was afforded the opportunity to scrape together an existence without wasting away in a cubicle. Today, I have the privilege of working from my home office as a freelance designer/animator. I've been able to serve several local companies to help meet their clients’ visual needs. Any freelancer can tell you that often times it’s a trade off in lifestyle. Although I no longer suffer a soul stealing existence of being in a box under fluorescent lights, I face the reality that I must fend for myself entirely. It can either be feast or famine when it comes to the work coming in the door. Albeit tough at times, I appreciate the hustle and grind of scraping together an existence solely on what I create. When I’m not on these projects, I can be found frantically moving back & forth between my 3D printers making objects for the house and models for the local Pokemon GO community that my son & I belong to. I’m attempting to turn this into a business. I am blessed to be alive in this day & age. At no other time in history has there been the means for which a creative mind can articulate his/her own visions like it exists today. I want to thank my mother for encouraging and stimulating art and creativity way back when. I also want to thank my father for his financial support over the years to allow me to continue to do what I love. I would like to thank my girlfriend Carolyn for her patience when I’m gripped with the insatiable urge to create. My apologies for having usurped the garage. Lastly, I want to thank my beautiful son. Bodhi, you are my muse and my greatest source of inspiration. Thanks for having me as your dad.
My earliest recollections of the desire to design and create dates back to my childhood in the late 70s and early 80s. I was seven years old when Star Wars came out. I fell in love with not only the movie but also the beautiful illustrative work that helped promote the franchise. I received a few books the following Christmas that included illustrations by Hildebrandt brothers and cross section diagrams of starships. Pouring over their pages and seeing what was possible made me want very badly to become an artist. When I wasn’t out riding my skateboard or BMX bike, I could be found drawing X-wing and Tie fighters long past bedtime. A few years later my parents purchased an Apple //e for the house. Oh what a glorious time this was! I spent hours playing Zork and Wizardry making maps on graph paper that helped me complete the torturous mazes. When I wasn’t playing games, I spent much of my time on the computer experimenting with rudimentary graphics programs. I didn’t know it at the time, but this glorious machine with green monochrome screen and 64k memory would steer me in the direction I'm headed today. My creative endeavors went on hiatus for a time and it wasn’t until my mid 20s that the spark for creation was rekindled. I had just been honorably discharged from the Marine Corps and I faced with the proposition of what to do with my life. I moved to Colorado and found work at a technical support call center. It was here that I rediscovered computers and was introduced to Photoshop and Bryce 3D. Shortly after being introduced to these programs, I enrolled in the Art Institute of Colorado and began studying 3D Design & Animation. After graduation from art school, I went to work as a graphic/motion designer for a small local instructional design company. Here, I learned the ways of the digital artist and immersed myself in all the latest tools and programs. I also learned that I didn’t need to sit in a cubicle all day to work on the stuff I love. Thankfully, with increasing internet speeds and changing business models, I was afforded the opportunity to scrape together an existence without wasting away in a cubicle. Today, I have the privilege of working from my home office as a freelance designer/animator. I've been able to serve several local companies to help meet their clients’ visual needs. Any freelancer can tell you that often times it’s a trade off in lifestyle. Although I no longer suffer a soul stealing existence of being in a box under fluorescent lights, I face the reality that I must fend for myself entirely. It can either be feast or famine when it comes to the work coming in the door. Albeit tough at times, I appreciate the hustle and grind of scraping together an existence solely on what I create. When I’m not on these projects, I can be found frantically moving back & forth between my 3D printers making objects for the house and models for the local Pokemon GO community that my son & I belong to. I’m attempting to turn this into a business. I am blessed to be alive in this day & age. At no other time in history has there been the means for which a creative mind can articulate his/her own visions like it exists today. I want to thank my mother for encouraging and stimulating art and creativity way back when. I also want to thank my father for his financial support over the years to allow me to continue to do what I love. I would like to thank my girlfriend Carolyn for her patience when I’m gripped with the insatiable urge to create. My apologies for having usurped the garage. Lastly, I want to thank my beautiful son. Bodhi, you are my muse and my greatest source of inspiration. Thanks for having me as your dad.
My earliest recollections of the desire to design and create dates back to my childhood in the late 70s and early 80s. I was seven years old when Star Wars came out. I fell in love with not only the movie but also the beautiful illustrative work that helped promote the franchise. I received a few books the following Christmas that included illustrations by Hildebrandt brothers and cross section diagrams of starships. Pouring over their pages and seeing what was possible made me want very badly to become an artist. When I wasn’t out riding my skateboard or BMX bike, I could be found drawing X-wing and Tie fighters long past bedtime. A few years later my parents purchased an Apple //e for the house. Oh what a glorious time this was! I spent hours playing Zork and Wizardry making maps on graph paper that helped me complete the torturous mazes. When I wasn’t playing games, I spent much of my time on the computer experimenting with rudimentary graphics programs. I didn’t know it at the time, but this glorious machine with green monochrome screen and 64k memory would steer me in the direction I'm headed today. My creative endeavors went on hiatus for a time and it wasn’t until my mid 20s that the spark for creation was rekindled. I had just been honorably discharged from the Marine Corps and I faced with the proposition of what to do with my life. I moved to Colorado and found work at a technical support call center. It was here that I rediscovered computers and was introduced to Photoshop and Bryce 3D. Shortly after being introduced to these programs, I enrolled in the Art Institute of Colorado and began studying 3D Design & Animation. After graduation from art school, I went to work as a graphic/motion designer for a small local instructional design company. Here, I learned the ways of the digital artist and immersed myself in all the latest tools and programs. I also learned that I didn’t need to sit in a cubicle all day to work on the stuff I love. Thankfully, with increasing internet speeds and changing business models, I was afforded the opportunity to scrape together an existence without wasting away in a cubicle. Today, I have the privilege of working from my home office as a freelance designer/animator. I've been able to serve several local companies to help meet their clients’ visual needs. Any freelancer can tell you that often times it’s a trade off in lifestyle. Although I no longer suffer a soul stealing existence of being in a box under fluorescent lights, I face the reality that I must fend for myself entirely. It can either be feast or famine when it comes to the work coming in the door. Albeit tough at times, I appreciate the hustle and grind of scraping together an existence solely on what I create. When I’m not on these projects, I can be found frantically moving back & forth between my 3D printers making objects for the house and models for the local Pokemon GO community that my son & I belong to. I’m attempting to turn this into a business. I am blessed to be alive in this day & age. At no other time in history has there been the means for which a creative mind can articulate his/her own visions like it exists today. I want to thank my mother for encouraging and stimulating art and creativity way back when. I also want to thank my father for his financial support over the years to allow me to continue to do what I love. I would like to thank my girlfriend Carolyn for her patience when I’m gripped with the insatiable urge to create. My apologies for having usurped the garage. Lastly, I want to thank my beautiful son. Bodhi, you are my muse and my greatest source of inspiration. Thanks for having me as your dad.
My earliest recollections of the desire to design and create dates back to my childhood in the late 70s and early 80s. I was seven years old when Star Wars came out. I fell in love with not only the movie but also the beautiful illustrative work that helped promote the franchise. I received a few books the following Christmas that included illustrations by Hildebrandt brothers and cross section diagrams of starships. Pouring over their pages and seeing what was possible made me want very badly to become an artist. When I wasn’t out riding my skateboard or BMX bike, I could be found drawing X-wing and Tie fighters long past bedtime. A few years later my parents purchased an Apple //e for the house. Oh what a glorious time this was! I spent hours playing Zork and Wizardry making maps on graph paper that helped me complete the torturous mazes. When I wasn’t playing games, I spent much of my time on the computer experimenting with rudimentary graphics programs. I didn’t know it at the time, but this glorious machine with green monochrome screen and 64k memory would steer me in the direction I'm headed today. My creative endeavors went on hiatus for a time and it wasn’t until my mid 20s that the spark for creation was rekindled. I had just been honorably discharged from the Marine Corps and I faced with the proposition of what to do with my life. I moved to Colorado and found work at a technical support call center. It was here that I rediscovered computers and was introduced to Photoshop and Bryce 3D. Shortly after being introduced to these programs, I enrolled in the Art Institute of Colorado and began studying 3D Design & Animation. After graduation from art school, I went to work as a graphic/motion designer for a small local instructional design company. Here, I learned the ways of the digital artist and immersed myself in all the latest tools and programs. I also learned that I didn’t need to sit in a cubicle all day to work on the stuff I love. Thankfully, with increasing internet speeds and changing business models, I was afforded the opportunity to scrape together an existence without wasting away in a cubicle. Today, I have the privilege of working from my home office as a freelance designer/animator. I've been able to serve several local companies to help meet their clients’ visual needs. Any freelancer can tell you that often times it’s a trade off in lifestyle. Although I no longer suffer a soul stealing existence of being in a box under fluorescent lights, I face the reality that I must fend for myself entirely. It can either be feast or famine when it comes to the work coming in the door. Albeit tough at times, I appreciate the hustle and grind of scraping together an existence solely on what I create. When I’m not on these projects, I can be found frantically moving back & forth between my 3D printers making objects for the house and models for the local Pokemon GO community that my son & I belong to. I’m attempting to turn this into a business. I am blessed to be alive in this day & age. At no other time in history has there been the means for which a creative mind can articulate his/her own visions like it exists today. I want to thank my mother for encouraging and stimulating art and creativity way back when. I also want to thank my father for his financial support over the years to allow me to continue to do what I love. I would like to thank my girlfriend Carolyn for her patience when I’m gripped with the insatiable urge to create. My apologies for having usurped the garage. Lastly, I want to thank my beautiful son. Bodhi, you are my muse and my greatest source of inspiration. Thanks for having me as your dad.